ICANN: Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (“ICANN”) is a not-for-profit public-benefit corporation dedicated to keeping the Internet secure, stable and interoperable. It promotes competition and develops policy on the Internet's unique identifiers. Through its coordination role of the Internet's naming system, it does have an important impact on the expansion and evolution of the Internet.

While ICANN, which was created on September 18, 1998, and incorporated on September 30, 1998 in the State of California, has its roots in the U.S. government, it is now, and continues to strive to be, an international, community-driven organization. Their management of an interoperable Internet covers over 180 million domain names, the allocation of more than 4 billion network addresses, and the support of approximately a trillion DNS look-ups everyday across 240 countries.

Most of ICANN’s work has concerned the Internet's global Domain Name System, including policy development for internationalization of the DNS system, introduction of new generic top-level domains (TLDs), and the operation of root name servers.