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Image: Etro
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1. One Year on, Has the Pandemic Taught the Fashion Industry Sustainable Lessons? The hope is that brands will rethink their relationships with their factories and change their purchasing practices – the way they negotiate and mercilessly drive down contracts with factories. – Read More on Vogue

2. Billionaire Fungs Weigh Sale of Luxury Bagmaker Delvaux: Hong Kong billionaire brothers Victor and William Fung are exploring selling their stake in Delvaux, a 192-year-old Belgian luxury leather bagmaker, people with knowledge of the matter said. – Read More on Bloomberg

3. Another rumored deal in the making? The LVMH-affiliated L Catterton is said to be looking to add Etro to its growing roster. While the Etro family has long denied interest in selling its namesake company, on Monday it said it was “evaluating possible partnerships,” as sources say it has tapped Rothschild as its adviser. – Read More on WWD

4. Defeated Amazon union campaign could still spur more labor activism in Big Tech: Big Tech companies are likely to see more organized labor initiatives from blue- and white-collar employees, despite a recent failed effort to form a union at an Amazon.com Inc. warehouse in Alabama, labor experts say. – Read More on S&P Global

5. From Gently Used Nikes To Rapper-Backed Reeboks, Footwear Moves to Find New Feet: At the heart of Nike’s makeover are materials, which the company says account for 70 percent of its carbon footprint, and are at the foot of its push to accelerate research and development around sustainable materials and finding low-carbon alternatives to market at scale. – Read More on PYMNTS

6. RELATED READ: Companies are Pushing for Circularity and Raising Legal Questions in the Process. Nike revealed that as part of a new “Refurbished” initiative, it will take “like new (maybe worn for a day or two before being returned), gently worn (a little longer) and cosmetically flawed (think: something like a small snag that happened in manufacturing)” sneakers that consumers return, “tidy them up,” and sell them at a number of its stores across the U.S., alongside brand-new wares. – Read More on TFL