image: Andrea Jiapei Li

image: Andrea Jiapei Li

Since Burberry announced in February that it would adjust its runway-to-retail model to get a hold on the sped-up seasonal cycle and to better meet the demands of consumers, no shortage of other brands have adopted the change. One of this season’s adopters: MADE. The self-described “year-round, dynamic platform that connects emerging talent in fashion, music, art and culture with visionary brand partners,” which sponsors and hosts an array of fashion shows and presentations each season during New York Fashion Week, has announced its take on the revamped runway-to-retail timeline.

According to a statement from the New York-based company: MADE New York just got a whole lot sicker. This Fashion Week, in addition to the 20+ runway shows and designer presentations that MADE organizes each season, we’re curating an immersive pop-up retail experience. The retail store will showcase a mix of art, video, music installations, and product from world class local and international designer brands, including everyone from Andrea Jiapei Li [pictured above] and Maison The Faux to The Blonds. Gather your crew and slide through the retail space that’s open to the public in the final three days of Fashion Week adjacent to Milk Studios in the Meatpacking District.

MADE joins the likes of Balmain, Thakoon, Tommy Hilfiger, Michael Kors, Vetements, Topshop, Prada, and Tom Ford, among other brands, that have announced plans – and in some cases, already implements changes – over the past several months to better connect with digital-era consumers, who have come to expect instantaneous access to runway show images, and the garments and accessories, themselves.

Ford, who previously banned all photos from his shows to avoid leaks, summed up the larger movement towards making collections instantly shoppable. Earlier this year, he stated: “In a world that has become increasingly immediate, the current way of showing a collection four months before it is available to customers is an antiquated idea and one that no longer makes sense. Our customers today want a collection that is immediately available . . . Showing the collection as it arrives in stores will remedy this, and allow the excitement that is created by a show or event to drive sales and satisfy our customers’ increasing desire to have their clothes as they are ready to wear them.”