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1. Next deal keeps Gap brand alive in the UK: The move will preserve some of Gap’s physical presence on the High Street after Gap announced in July it would close all of its UK stores. It is a similar deal to one signed with clothing brand Reiss earlier this year. – Read More on BBC

2. Nirvana ‘Nevermind’ Baby’s Lawsuit Raises Hard Questions: Spencer Elden, now 30 years old, is the baby who was featured on the cover of Nirvana’s “Nevermind” album. He argues that the image is pornographic and that, as an infant, he was forced to engage in commercial sex. – Read More on Bloomberg

3. China’s luxury market is more resilient than you think: In late August, Chinese President Xi Jinping took his government’s regulatory campaign a step further, calling for “common prosperity” and “wealth redistribution.” The directive suggested that another clampdown might be on the way; one that would rein in Chinese consumers’ penchant for luxury goods. – Read More on Fortune

4. Why fashion models have a stake in Adult Victims Act: The bill would make it easier for the adult victims and survivors of sexual abuse to file lawsuits by opening a legal look-back window. Based on a similar law for childhood victims, this proposal has stalled in the state Assembly. – Read More on Spectrum

5. Fast fashion in the U.S. is fueling an environmental disaster in Ghana: Many Americans donate their used clothing to charities when they are finished with it, under the assumption that it will be reused. But with the increasing amount of items being discarded, and the poorer quality of fast fashion, less and less can be resold, and millions of garments are put into bales and shipped abroad every year. – Read More on CBS

6. Amazon Is Doing It. So Is Walmart. Why Retail Loves “Buy Now, Pay Later.” Shoppers spend more at Macy’s when they use installment plans offered through Klarna Bank AB, Macy’s CEO Jeff Gennette said on a recent earnings call. Klarna also is helping the retailer attract younger customers, he said. – Read More on the WSJ